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Religious education (RE) is compulsory for all pupils in Government funded schools up to the age of 18. Schools must follow their locally agreed syllabus, and provide a daily act of collective worship that should be broadly Christian, unless the school has been allowed to perform acts of worship of another faith. Given the importance placed on RE there are plenty of resources available to support students. What follows is our recommendations for Primary School Religious Education. Religious Festivals: Children will enjoy learning about different traditions and celebrations of the following religions: Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism and Sikhism. Information is provided, questions are answered and activities and worksheets are provided for use in class or at home. There are also beautifully presented videos on mysterious topics such as ‘The riddle of Palm Sunday’. Worksheets can be quite challenging, since they ask children to fill in the blanks in ample bodies of t

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It’s an anxious time for parents when their child is not offered a place at the school of their choice. So some consider home schooling instead as, with increasing support and resources online, it grows in popularity. If you do a search you’ll find several articles around this site about the subject, but here are some quick answers to the most common questions: How does it work? Parents use a variety of approaches to learning and can choose which suits. They often start with the familiar school style approach using pre-determined curriculum, workbooks, exercises and programmes, many online. But as parents grow in confidence, meet others and see the way they do it, it becomes apparent that there are a variety of ways to learn, most effectively through first hand experiences. Children can learn from whatever they are doing, at any time, through varied activities, through being engaged, stimulated and motivated. Home educating families learn out of the home as much as in it, from pra

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It s always been the stereotype that students are either incredibly poor, rather rich or capable of spending their entire loan on baked beans and vodka.  Probably a little harsh, since many students are able to make budgets stretch quite well, meaning that they can have a balanced lifestyle and still enjoy themselves.  All in all, not too bad then. Students get loans and grants and many are lucky enough to have the backing of their parents.  Overall, many are able to live quite comfortably.  I, for instance, won t get any grants next year for university (I get the Erasmus Grant this year to help with my placement in order to help with the extra expenses of studying abroad) but I hopefully will get the continued support of my parents and the loans that the Student Loans Company (SLC) provide. I appreciate that for some students it does not work quite so easily some may find themselves less able to help pay their way through university especially for those on a limited budget in an

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It may be not be a surprise to learn that England had the worst language skills in Europe. Following a change in Government policy in England, it will be compulsory for primary school children aged seven and above to learn another language, from September 2014. As the responsibility for education is devolved to Scotland and Wales, this has also sparked debate there. Given concern about the teaching of foreign languages, we have come up with a list of useful websites which provide great resources for those wishing to supplement what their children are learning at school, or for homeschoolers. What follows are our top resources for Primary School Languages. Primary Languages: Spanish: This colourful site contains the very basics of Spanish vocabulary – children can learn to count, talk about their families and pronounce sounds which are not used in English. Typical sentences, such as ‘I am hungry’ or ‘I want a drink’, come with audio recordings, so children can learn to get t

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Those with an eye on the education news may have noticed that it was announced that as part of the overhaul of the exam system the Arts subjects were going to be made more ‘rigorous and demanding’ This is the education secretary, Mr Gove s attempt to make schools ‘nurture creative talent in every child’. This is potentially great, but what is of concern is the manner in which this is to happen. For if this means that these subjects are going to lean towards more academic content it’s more likely to be the case that creative talent will be sacrificed not nurtured. The problem comes firstly from the fact that the Arts subjects are less academic which is exactly why they are incredibly important for some children, giving them an opportunity to excel in other skills. This would be fine except for the fact that less academic subjects are still considered inferior within the system’s hierarchy. And the second problem comes with the assessment and measurement of them. The increas

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Often I find that little bits and pieces of education news crop up that are worth mentioning though perhaps one not quite major enough to write an entire article about it.  For certain subjects, we find that there are little updates that we could mention possibly there is a little progress in the world of university staff pay but to simply go over the same argument again and again would be a waste for the reader. So, after trying desperately to find a way of keeping you all up to date on the various happenings in the world of education, we at Tutorhub came up with the idea of a weekly round-up basically a newspaper for our blog!  We ll let you know about the best and the worst of the week and what s going on. This week has seen a fair few interesting things pop up, from a new-look GCSE and A-Level plan, to free school meals for infants, to a painful student debt truth. So, what did we spot that was noteworthy this week? Birmingham Schools Controversy has another plot twist Many medi

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Learning about the world and its history is a key part of primary school teaching. What follows is our resource recommendations for Primary School History. World History: Children can discover important artefacts from world history through a dynamic interactive timeline, quizzes and videos, while teachers will find a host of lesson plans and activities to engage students. Parents can click on individual topics with their children (for instance, the Rosetta Stone). The site presents a short explanation on what makes the artefact so special and features photographs and videos on related subject matter (in the case of the Rosetta Stone, videos are provided for everything from the names of Ancient Egyptian Pharaohs to the magnificent tomb of Tutankhamun). Ancient Greeks: This site does plenty to bring children closer to the wonders of ancient history, allowing them to select from a number of categories, including Home life, Gods and heroes, Arts and theatre and Greeks at war. Each categor

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Whilst memories of our primary school days may be foggy plenty of time has passed, lets be honest, who doesn t remember their time singing songs and banging away on a tambourine or tinkling on a triangle. What maybe we don t realise is that music is important as it can change the way pupils feel, think and act. It brings together intellect, feeling and allows personal expression and emotional development. As part of our culture, past and present, it helps pupils understand themselves, relate to others and develop their cultural understanding, forging important links between home, school and the wider world. Music is a key part of our school lives. What follows is our recommended resources for Primary School Music. Musical Mysteries: This interactive site is designed to support the Northern Ireland Music curriculum for students in Key Stage 1 and 2. It encourages students to explore basic musical concepts, including sound, rhythm and mood. The site has three different areas, for pupils

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Just a quick post to let you know that Tutorhub was featured in The Telegraph last weekend. In an article entitled Online learning: tutors at your fingertips , Katie Hughes took a look at tutoring, the Tutors Association and the increasing numbers of students turning to online tutoring. The article focused on the businesses and agencies operating in the online tutoring market, and did not cover independent tutors offering online tutoring direct, which has resulted in some criticism from within the industry, but nevertheless shed some new light on what is happening in the new and dynamic market of online tutoring in the UK. When looking at Tutorhub, Katie wrote: Online tutoring service Tutorhub, which has more than 5,000 students and 700 tutors on its books, has been among those at the receiving end of parents’ attention. “We’ve seen a 500 per cent growth in demand over the last 12 months, across every subject imaginable, at every level – especially from students in rural are

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Most of us hardly think of cooking as an important part of educating. It tends to be regarded as another of those less important subjects like arts or sports we disregard in favour of ‘real’ education like academic stuff. However, if we are truly educating young people towards leading independent lives, knowing how to function well both in the world and as an individual, then we also need to educate them towards taking responsibility for their own well being. And the way they eat is part of that. Although nutrition is part of the curriculum, it is seldom reflected in youngsters’ diet. And in the light of the most recent news probably cooking is a necessary part. A study has shown that we need to be eating even more fruit and vegetables than the 5-a-day we’re familiar with. This needs to go up to 7-a-day in order to maintain optimum health, to lesson our chances of contracting many familiar diseases and help prevent premature deaths. I suspect most of us find it hard to process