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Students sometimes take years to devise an effective revision strategy which truly reflects the amount of hard work they have been putting in throughout the year. It is no secret that the most successful students aren’t necessarily the ones who study the longest hours or sacrifice a personal and social life; rather, the lucky few tend to be no less than great time managers, planners, and strategists. Follow these tips and make every second count; during the exam period, time is simply too precious to waste. Don’t Cram: A recent study undertaken by Professor Tom Stafford and his team at the University of Sheffield, has proven that what our teachers always told us was right: it doesn’t pay to cram. Stafford and his team conducted a study of over 850,000 subjects, finding that they performed better at online games when they left a day between practice sessions, than those who left no gaps between sessions. The researchers concluded that when it comes to learning, the quantity of ti

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Looking for a challenge and an opportunity to learn and have fun? There’s no denying that the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award scheme is a great opportunity to do this and get recognised for your achievements. In the organisation’s own words it gives young people, aged from 14 to 24 “the chance to develop skills for life and work, fulfil their potential and have a brighter future”. The programme includes volunteering, physical activity, skills and expeditions. For many youngsters the expeditions – and all that entails are a totally new experience. Even the kit list can strike fear into the hearts of participants, and their parents. Here are some important things to know when preparing for your Duke of Edinburgh’s expeditions: If you don’t have the right kit, you might not get to take part. The right equipment isn’t just there to make you look the part, it’s crucial for safety. Therefore, turning up with the wrong stuff might mean you get sent back home again before you’

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Every time we hear about the newest set of GCSE and A Level results, we find it is a time for reflection and celebration.  Our kids have done well, cementing their legacy on their school and setting themselves up for the future.  It s really quite a memorable time for everyone.  I can remember some of the successes I enjoyed at GCSE and then the massive relief of, despite being worried that I would drop out of Sixth Form altogether after some disappointing AS results, finding that I was on my way to university, on the back of decent Mathematics, IT and French grades.  I was really rather chuffed. Of course, open the Daily Mail each year and there s always some hardcore right-wing columnist who believes that not only are we all studying the wrong subjects, but we re also seeing that horrid thing called grade inflation.  The exams are getting easier and the students aren t getting any brighter, despite the results and averages improving generally year-on-year.  Coming from a group

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There are lots of websites out there that provide resources to parents, to support their child s learning at home. We have taken a good look at all of the websites out there, and what follows is our list of recommended resources for Primary School Geography: Sparklebox: This site features a host of resources on topics for KS1 and KS2 Geography, and features an array of topics, including the Environment, Recycling, Society, the Weather and Seasons, Rivers, Mountains, Rocks and Soils, are more. The resource is aimed at teachers, since it contains a wealth of materials, such as printable posters, worksheets for use in class, templates to print out and laminate, etc. However, students and parents will also find useful information, including photographs of buildings, printable word cards for sentence building, and even items like a ‘park animals spotting form’, which children can take to the park, ticking off various animals they encounter. Top Marks: The Geography section on this han

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Anyone would think that the world of education and family life might, just occasionally, just slow down a bit.  For writers such as myself, a quiet few days allow us to sit down and ponder some of the finer points of education and the like. It almost sounds like I need a sherry and a manifesto to pore over for a few hours. However, we re not even half way through the week and already my inbox is filled with a million stories about education and what s going on.  I haven t even had time to buy the sherry, let alone open it and pour myself a glass.  As for the manifesto?  That s going to have to wait for a while, I fear. This week has already brought up a few surprises for us, ranging from some troubling matters than just won t go away, to new emerging issues that we re all keen to catch up on to even the laughable things that make me glad I currently live on the other side of the English Channel. So, without further ado, here is the good, the bad and the truly strange from the last

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Religious education (RE) is compulsory for all pupils in Government funded schools up to the age of 18. Schools must follow their locally agreed syllabus, and provide a daily act of collective worship that should be broadly Christian, unless the school has been allowed to perform acts of worship of another faith. Given the importance placed on RE there are plenty of resources available to support students. What follows is our recommendations for Primary School Religious Education. Religious Festivals: Children will enjoy learning about different traditions and celebrations of the following religions: Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism and Sikhism. Information is provided, questions are answered and activities and worksheets are provided for use in class or at home. There are also beautifully presented videos on mysterious topics such as ‘The riddle of Palm Sunday’. Worksheets can be quite challenging, since they ask children to fill in the blanks in ample bodies of t

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It’s an anxious time for parents when their child is not offered a place at the school of their choice. So some consider home schooling instead as, with increasing support and resources online, it grows in popularity. If you do a search you’ll find several articles around this site about the subject, but here are some quick answers to the most common questions: How does it work? Parents use a variety of approaches to learning and can choose which suits. They often start with the familiar school style approach using pre-determined curriculum, workbooks, exercises and programmes, many online. But as parents grow in confidence, meet others and see the way they do it, it becomes apparent that there are a variety of ways to learn, most effectively through first hand experiences. Children can learn from whatever they are doing, at any time, through varied activities, through being engaged, stimulated and motivated. Home educating families learn out of the home as much as in it, from pra

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It s always been the stereotype that students are either incredibly poor, rather rich or capable of spending their entire loan on baked beans and vodka.  Probably a little harsh, since many students are able to make budgets stretch quite well, meaning that they can have a balanced lifestyle and still enjoy themselves.  All in all, not too bad then. Students get loans and grants and many are lucky enough to have the backing of their parents.  Overall, many are able to live quite comfortably.  I, for instance, won t get any grants next year for university (I get the Erasmus Grant this year to help with my placement in order to help with the extra expenses of studying abroad) but I hopefully will get the continued support of my parents and the loans that the Student Loans Company (SLC) provide. I appreciate that for some students it does not work quite so easily some may find themselves less able to help pay their way through university especially for those on a limited budget in an

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It may be not be a surprise to learn that England had the worst language skills in Europe. Following a change in Government policy in England, it will be compulsory for primary school children aged seven and above to learn another language, from September 2014. As the responsibility for education is devolved to Scotland and Wales, this has also sparked debate there. Given concern about the teaching of foreign languages, we have come up with a list of useful websites which provide great resources for those wishing to supplement what their children are learning at school, or for homeschoolers. What follows are our top resources for Primary School Languages. Primary Languages: Spanish: This colourful site contains the very basics of Spanish vocabulary – children can learn to count, talk about their families and pronounce sounds which are not used in English. Typical sentences, such as ‘I am hungry’ or ‘I want a drink’, come with audio recordings, so children can learn to get t

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Those with an eye on the education news may have noticed that it was announced that as part of the overhaul of the exam system the Arts subjects were going to be made more ‘rigorous and demanding’ This is the education secretary, Mr Gove s attempt to make schools ‘nurture creative talent in every child’. This is potentially great, but what is of concern is the manner in which this is to happen. For if this means that these subjects are going to lean towards more academic content it’s more likely to be the case that creative talent will be sacrificed not nurtured. The problem comes firstly from the fact that the Arts subjects are less academic which is exactly why they are incredibly important for some children, giving them an opportunity to excel in other skills. This would be fine except for the fact that less academic subjects are still considered inferior within the system’s hierarchy. And the second problem comes with the assessment and measurement of them. The increas